ARTS May 9, 2019. “Race in Classic Horror: Dracula and the Fear of Reverse Colonialism.” Shades of Noir , 9 May 2019, shadesofnoir.org.uk/race-in-classic-horror-dracula-and-the-fear-of-reverse-colonialism/

Tamara James-Dickson argues that many horror classics reflect a sense of cultural guilt regarding many social issues. Specifically, Dickson argues that Dracula was utilized to show public guilt against colonial issues, stating late Victorian society had a growing “uneasiness over the morality of Imperialism.” I connect Dickson’s research to my own through the focus of reverse colonialism in Dracula, particularly looking for evidence regarding cultural guilt and examples of the ‘primitive’ conquering the ‘civilized.’ I plan to use this research as a tool to further develop my analysis of Dracula by utilizing concepts described in the research and focusing specifically on Dracula.

--

--

Dear Autumn,

My name is Swayam and I’m a first year Computer Science major. I’m writing to you in regards to the Epistolary Genre assignment in our WRIT 2 course.

My current impressions of Dracula are positive and the reading has captured my attention in regards to Dracula’s motives and what he plans on doing next. I am particularly interested in researching what drives Dracula’s potentially insidious motives and I believe it could be tied to the power that the Count’s bloodline has lost over the many years. I am looking forward to hearing about your research interest as well.

Best,

Swayam Saraiya

--

--